Total lunar eclipse

A total eclipse of the Moon will take place on the evening of Wednesday 8 October. The Moon starts moving into the Earth’s shadow at 8:15 pm AEDT and is fully immersed in the shadow at 9:25 pm. Totality is over at 10:25 pm and the eclipse ends at 11:35 pm. For people in the eastern half of Australia and New Zealand the whole eclipse is visible, while for people in the west the eclipse starts with the rising of the partially eclipsed moon.

For more details, see our factsheet.

2014 ASA Prizes

The ASA is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2014 ASA Awards. The prize winners presented their research at the ASA meeting at Maquarie University.

  • Bok Prize for outstanding research in astronomy by an Honours or eligible Masters student
    Awarded to Ross Turner, University of Tasmania, for his thesis “Evolution of radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei.” Ross was supervised by Stanislav Shabala. In additiona, an honourable mention goes to Chris Herron, University of Sydney, for his thesis “Probing Cosmic Magnetic Fields with Faraday Rotation and Depolarisation”,  supervised by Bryan Gaensler and Shane O’Sullivan.
  • Charlene Heisler Prize for the most outstanding PhD thesis in astronomy
    arded to Justin Bray, University of Adelaide, for his thesis “Lunar Radio Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Particles.” Justin was supervised by Raymond Protheroe.  An honourable mention went to Anthony Conn of Macquarie University for his thesis “Structure of the M31 Satellite System: Bayesian Distances from the Tip of the Red Giant Branch”, which was supervised by Quentin Parker.
  • Louise Webster Prize for outstanding research by a scientist early in their post-doctoral career
    Awarded to Dr Simon Campbell (Monash Universit) for his paper “Sodium content as a predictor of the advanced evolution of globular cluster stars”.
Congratulations to all our prize winners!

2014 Gruber Foundation Cosmology Prize

ASA member Ken Freeman has been honoured for his significant contributions to near field cosmology in the 2014 Gruber Foundation Cosmology PrizeThis year’s prize has been awarded to Jaan Einasto, Ken Freeman, R. Brent Tully, and Sidney van den Bergh for their individual roles in the development of near field cosmology — laying the foundation in our understanding of the structure and composition of the nearby Universe.  The Cosmology Prize honours a leading cosmologist, astronomer, astrophysicist or scientific philosopher for theoretical, analytical, conceptual or observational discoveries leading to fundamental advances in our understanding of the Universe.  Congratulations Ken!

2013 ASA Robert Ellery Lectureship

The 2013 ASA Robert Ellery Lectureship was awarded to Prof Rachel Webster.  The Robert Ellery Lectureship is awarded to an ASA member every second year for their outstanding contributions to astronomy throughout their career to date.  Congratulations to Rachel!

2013 ASA Awards

The ASA is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2013 ASA Awards. The prize winners will be presenting their research at the upcoming ASA meeting at Monash University.

  • Bok Prize for outstanding research in astronomy by an Honours or eligible Masters student
    Awarded to Ben Pope for his thesis “Dancing in the Dark: Kernel Phase Interferometry of Ultracool Dwarfs”. Ben completed his honours research at the University of Sydney, supervised by Peter Tuthill and Frantz Martinache.In addition, Andrew Lehmann receives an honourable mention for his thesis “Shock Waves in Turbulent Molecular Clouds” completed at Macquarie University and supervised by Mark Wardle.
  • Charlene Heisler Prize for the most outstanding PhD thesis in astronomy
    Awarded to Emily Wisniosky for her thesis “The Kinematic Properties of Clumpy Star-Forming Galaxies”, completed at Swinburne University and supervised by Karl Glazebrook.There were also two Honourable Mentions: Daniel Huber for  his thesis “Asteroseismology and Interferometry of Cool Stars” completed at University of Sydney and supervised by Tim Bedding, and Keith Bannister for his thesis “Astrophysical Radio Transients: Surveys and Techniques” completed at University of Sydney and supervised by Bryan Gaensler, Tara Murphy and Tim Cornwell.
  • Louise Webster Prize for outstanding research by a scientist early in their post-doctoral career
    Awarded to Andy Green (Swinburne University) for his paper “High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies”.In addition, Alan Duffy (U. Melbourne) receives a commendation for his paper on the “Impact of baryon physics on dark matter structures: a detailed simulation study of halo density profiles”.
Congratulations to all our prize winners!

Solar eclipse, 10 May 2013

On the morning of Friday 10 May 2013 an annular eclipse of the Sun will be visible along a track crossing northern Australia, also visible as a partial eclipse over much of Australia. For more details, see our new factsheet #25.

2013 Australia Day Honours List

Three members of the Astronomical Society of Australia are among more than 500 people recognised yesterday in the Australia Day Honours List:

  • Professor Brian Schmidt (Order of Australia) –  For eminent service as a global science leader in the field of physics through research in the study of astronomy and astrophysics, contributions to scientific bodies and the promotion of science education.
  • Professor Michael Dopita (Order of Australia) – For significant service to science in the field of astronomy and astrophysics.
  • Professor Brian Boyle (Public Service Medal) – For outstanding public service to Australian astronomy and for leadership of the Australian team bidding to host the international Square Kilometre Array facility.

For more information, see the Australia Day 2013 Honours List.

Congratulations to Brian, Mike and Brian!

2013 Academy awards for scientific excellence

The Australian Academy of Science today announced the 2013 winners of its prestigious annual awards for scientific excellence. Congratulations to ASA members Ken Freeman and Chris Blake, who have both received awards.

  • Professor Kenneth Freeman FAA FRS, Australian National University – 2013 Matthew Flinders Medal and Lecture:
    The Matthew Flinders Medal and Lecture recognises scientific research of the highest standing in the physical sciences, and honours the contributions of Australia’s early scientific researchers. Nominations for this award are invited from Academy Fellows only.
  • Associate Professor Christopher Blake, Swinburne University of Technology – 2013 Pawsey Medal:
    The Pawsey Medal recognises the outstanding research in physics by early-mid career scientists. Chris is part of the Wiggle Z survey team and develops techniques to measure the properties of dark energy.

For more details, see the Academy’s press release. Congratulations to Ken and Chris!

 

Ken Freeman wins 2012 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science

Prof Ken Freeman from the Australia National University has been awarded the 2012 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science. The Prime Minister’s Prize for Science recognises outstanding achievements by Australians in science and technology that promotes human welfare.
Ken has been shaping and changing our view of the Universe over the past 50 years. He is famous for his incredible contribution to our understanding of Galaxies and dark matter and his impressive publication record. Throughout his career Ken has been committed to training the next generation of astronomers and supporting the Australian astronomy community. Ken has served on many national astronomy committees and was the Secretary for the Astronomical Society of Australia between 1971-1972. In 2001, Ken was awarded the Society’s Robert Ellery Lectureship in recognition of his outstanding contributions in astronomy. Ken has supervised more than 50 astronomy students and continues to be a mentor, inspiration and friend to us all.
Congratulations Ken!
For more information follow this link.

Solar eclipse 2012

On the morning of Wednesday 14 November 2012, there will be a total eclipse of the Sun visible from parts of Australia. This will be visible as a partial eclipse throughout the rest of the country.

For more details, see our factsheet.